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Who Else Wants More Website Conversions?

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puzzle
Okay, so you want more Website conversions. Sounds great.

First, let’s discuss a new marketing strategy you probably haven’t heard of: Remarketing (aka Retargeting)

This is good. In March 2010, Google launched their new capabilities in connecting the search engines with the content networks. It was revolutionary! (However, it went completely unnoticed.)

Here’s what happened: Google introduced retargeting (oops, I mean remarketing as Google calls it) which allows marketers to get in front of consumers who have already shown an interest in a product or service in the past. In other words, with remarketing, those “lost” customers are shown ads for the product or service they initially eyed as they surf elsewhere on the web. It allows you an opportunity to “remind” them they once clicked on your product or service.

A bit of controversy surrounds the subject which might explain why it hasn’t gone mainstream. However, some marketers are reporting 400% increases in their ad response since implementing their remarketing campaigns. I can understand the controversary because it might appear too aggressive or annoying to the customer. However, rising shopping cart abandonments and blindness to banner ads indicate a change in the marketplace. Google is advancing by offering us this opportunity. I suspect more companies will invest in this and it will expand rapidly.

Here’s an example on the consumer’s side by GeekEstate Blog writer Mathew Swanson:

About a month ago, I was searching for a new car – specifically an Infiniti G37. I didn’t plan on buying one anytime soon, but I was just starting to research. I was on Google and since my search yielded a very targeted paid search ad right to the Infiniti site on the G37, I clicked on it. I arrived on the Infiniti site to browse for a few minutes and research. Then, I left.

Well, since Infiniti wants to maximize all their paid clicks, they were able to leverage Google’s remarketing platform to notice that I had clicked the Infiniti PPC ad, but didn’t (in the eyes of whatever Infiniti wants me to do) convert.

Since then, for the past month, every site that I visit that’s showing Adsense (display ads), I see something like so:
adsense

You’ll notice that I was on a site about computer programming and C++, nothing related to cars in this case at all. Typically, Adsense is site sensitive and will serve ads to visitors based on the site’s content, except in the case of remarketing.

You will see ads based on the premise that you previously visited a site from a PPC customer of Google (Infiniti in this case) that didn’t achieve their goal. They do this in hopes to get you (the customer) to convert. So will I convert and give Infiniti my information so they can sell me a new car?

If they keep this remarketing campaign up, I just might indeed. See how this applies to the customers you’re currently losing that don’t convert once they click your PPC ad?

Good stuff. You can see how remarketing will increase conversions, lower advertising costs and give you a better chance of reconnecting with customers.

Hope this helps!

– Ron Reed

P.S. — Be sure to leave a comment and let me know how you’re applying this new marketing strategy. I want to hear your successes.

Written by Ron Reed

November 16th, 2010 at 12:10 pm